Chances are you've already busted the Christmas tree out of storage and put it all together wherever you display it in your home. If not, I'll assume you'll be doing it soon. If you're like my family, you have a pretty sizeable container of ornaments that go along with the tree. Some you've purchased on your own, while others have likely been given to you as gifts. You may have so many that you think you couldn't possibly have room for one more. But, I imagine that if you look hard enough, there's at least one spot you could find room for the new commemorative ornament the Evansville Police Department is selling for the 2021 holiday season.

Pictured above, the ornament features K9 Seargent. J. Thomas and K9 officer Abot, the latter of which "served his community unfailingly" until he passed away in May of this year, according to a post about the ornament sales on the Evansville Police Department's Facebook page. The two are set against a backdrop of the American flag, encircled by a Christmas-inspired holly wreath with a ribbon below that reads, "Evansville Police. Merry Christmas 2021."

The ornaments are on sale now for $15 each and can be purchased at the Evansville Police Department's Records Counter inside the Civic Center complex on Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard in Evansville during regular business hours.

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Proceeds from the sale of the ornaments will benefit the Evansville Police Foundation who will use the money to help provide specialized training for officers, and needed equipment, as well as help fund their scholarship and emergency fund program for officers in need of assistance who may find themselves in need of financial aid due to medical emergencies, or property damage caused by fire, tornadoes, etc.

[Source: Evansville Police Department on Facebook]

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KEEP READING: 10 Indiana Laws You Don't Know You're Breaking

SEE: 15 Animals You Cannot Own in Evansville

I got the idea for this after seeing an article by Michelle Heart with our Townsquare Media sister-station, 107.9 Lite-FM in Boise, Idaho. She had discovered several animals residents in that city can't own based on city codes she found online which got me thinking about whether Evansville had any regulations that were similar. Obviously, they did or this article wouldn't exist. Chapter 14, Article 3, section 42 and 43 spell out a lengthy list of exotic animals you can get in trouble owning if local officials find out. You can see the entire list on the city's website. These are the 15 I found to be the most interesting.