Dave Grohl said he recorded the vocal tracks for the upcoming Foo Fighters album Medicine at Midnight in a bathroom. The band first hinted at the move in January, when they shared a picture of a microphone set up in a bathtub.

He later revealed they had worked in a '40s house with a troubled history and that he believed was haunted, although he wasn’t allowed to say much about it.

“We moved into this funky old house in my neighborhood,” Grohl said in a new interview with Q104.3. “Built a studio in the upstairs bedroom. Recorded the drums in the living room, the guitars were in the bedroom. I did the vocals in the bathroom next to the toilet.”

He added: “We started this, I think, in maybe September last year, and we were finished by January, February. We were totally done – mixed, mastered, ready to go. Artwork was done, T-shirts were being made, equipment was on the trucks – we were good to go. And then everything just kind of shut down.”

With the coronavirus shutting down the Foo Fighters’ 25th-anniversary plans – which included a Van Tour of the cities they played in 1995 – Grohl said he was also faced with the problem of when to release the album, which is now scheduled for release on Feb. 26.

Recalling the “months and months” of deliberations while they waited to see if pandemic conditions might change, he noted that "six or seven months went by, and I'm like, ‘We make this music for people to hear. We don't just make it so that we can go hit the road. We write these songs so people can enjoy them and sing along, whether it's in their kitchen by themselves with a bottle of Crown Royal or in a stadium bouncing around, singing the choruses.

“So I was, like, ‘Right now, more than ever, people need something to lift their spirits, something to give them some feeling of relief or escape. … We've gotta put it out. Let's put it out right now.’ ... I don't know when we're gonna hit the road, but we need to give the music to the people, 'cause that's why we make it.”

You can listen to the interview below.

 

 

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