After getting little-to-no rain for a good chunk of the summer, it seems like we can't get rid of it now. Monday saw a line of storms come through that dumped between one to three inches of rain across the Tri-State, and the seven-day forecast shows we're not done with it yet as there's a chance every day through the early part of next week. While it's definitely needed, it would be nice if it spaced itself out a little more. But, outside of bringing an end to the hot and humid conditions we'd been dealing with for the past week or so, the rain also brought an end to the burn ban in Vanderburgh County on Wednesday morning.

Burn Ban Lifted in Vanderburgh County

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Both the Vanderburgh County Board of Commissioners and the Office of Mayor Lloyd Winnecke issued press releases stating that after consulting with the Evansville Fire Department along with other departments, including the Emergency Management Agency of Vanderburgh County and the Evansville Environmental Protection Agency, the "significant rainfall" the area had received so far was enough to lift the ban.

Surrounding Southern Indiana County Bans

Several surrounding counties also had burn bans in place but had lifted them prior to Vanderburgh County's announcement on Wednesday. Posey county lifted its ban over a week ago on July 19th, while Warrick and Perry Counties both lifted there's on Tuesday, July 25th. The only county with a ban still in place according to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources burn ban map is Spencer County.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources
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