If you are anything like the rest of us, you likely grew up enjoying a steaming bowl of Kraft Macaroni and Cheese in your younger years. You may even still enjoy the golden goodness now as an adult - no shame in that! But it isn't Macaroni and Cheese anymore.

What Do You Mean It Isn't Macaroni and Cheese?

Now before you come after me with your pitch pasta fork, let me explain. The recipe and the flavor you have come to know and love is not changing. Nothing about the recipe for this gooey heap of comfort food is changing.

So What's the Difference?

While the look, taste, texture, and smell will remain the same, what is changing is the name. Kraft is moving away from Macaroni and Cheese For 85 years we, along with our parents and grandparents have known that blue box as Kraft Macaroni and Cheese, but not anymore.

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Same Taste - New Name on the Box

So if it isn't Macaroni and Cheese anymore what is it? Kraft is shortening the name of their long-loved product and replacing the "and" with an ampersand. Moving forward, the easy dinner staple will be known as what most of us call it anyway - Kraft Mac & Cheese.

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The Original Comfort Food

In addition to the name change, Kraft has reworked the design stylings on the box. In a press release, Kraft says,

With over a million boxes sold every day, the cheesy bowls of deliciousness haven’t just filled America’s bellies; they’ve played an iconic role in every stage of people’s lives. Today, KraftMac & Cheese is unveiling a new brand identity that includes an updated logo, noodle smile and even a new name that redefines KraftMac & Cheese as feel-good food for everyone.

The new look updates all aspects of the brand identity: the name, the logo, brand colors, typography, photography, iconography, and packaging.

When Will We See It?

We can expect the new product packaging to start hitting store shelves in August.

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