One Indiana-based film company is proving their continued dedication to "growing the entertainment industry in Indiana" by offering Hoosier high school students the opportunity to have their short screenplay turned into a fully produced film.

Pigasus Pictures, the Indiana film company responsible for films like The Good Catholic and Ms. White Light, as well as many other titles, is currently accepting submissions from  Indiana high school students of original short screenplays.

This will mark the fifth year in a row that the filmmaking team at Pigasus Pictures has offered this opportunity to Hoosier students. Once selected, Pigasus will travel to the hometown of the winning high school student where they will fully produce the screenplay. Students from area schools will also have the opportunity to work on the project.

“Growing up in Indiana it often feels like the film industry is so far away.” Says John Armstrong, co-owner of Pigasus. “But with Project Pigasus we bring the film industry right to their doorstep.” Previous winners include Kira Daniels from Madison, Whitney Roberts & Cynthia Foulke from
Fishers, Marjorie Abrell from Spencer, and Sam Stanton of South Bend. Past winners have described this experience as “life changing.”

The deadline to submit a screenplay is February 5, 2022. The film will be produced later in 2022 and once completed will be shown in theaters across the Hoosier state and will also be made available on streaming services, in addition, to being submitted to film festivals across the United States.

Learn more about Pigasus Pictures, including the non-profit company known as  Pigasus Institute, and the Bloomington Academy of Film & Theatre that they launched in 2019. Go to ProjectPigasus.org to enter your screenplay.

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