It's 2022 and NOTHING is safe anymore.  Even our dearly beloved peanut butter has been tainted.

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Different kinds of Jif, including creamy, crunchy, natural, and reduced-fat have been recalled.

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Choosy Moms Don't Choose Salmonella

Who doesn't love peanut butter and jelly sandwich?  They're a staple in many households.  Unless you or someone in your house has a peanut allergy, there's a very good chance that you have a jar of peanut butter in your home.   Jif seems to be the top player when it comes to peanut butter, but unfortunately, they have a massive recall on their hands.  It seems there is a chance that some of Jif's peanut butter could be contaminated with salmonella.

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Salmonella Contamination in Jif Peanut Butter

According to the CDC the outbreak has caused fourteen illnesses and two hospitalizations across twelve different states.  So if you have the recalled peanut butter in your cabinet, EVEN if you've ingested some already, you should throw it out. Also, disinfect countertops and areas the peanut butter touched. 

Look at the lot code on your peanut butter:

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Here's what the CDC says about the numbers to look for on the side of your peanut butter:

  • Many types and sizes were recalled, including creamy, crunchy, natural, and reduced fat.
  • Lot code numbers 1274425 through 2140425, with “425” at the end of the first 7 numbers.

Salmonella Symptoms

The CDC says you should see your healthcare provider if you experience the following symptoms after ingesting the recalled peanut butter:

    • Diarrhea and a fever higher than 102°F
    • Diarrhea for more than 3 days that is not improving
    • Bloody diarrhea
    • So much vomiting that you cannot keep liquids down
    • Signs of dehydration, such as:
      • Not peeing much
      • Dry mouth and throat
      • Feeling dizzy when standing up

They say most people who are infected with salmonella will experience symptoms between 6 hours and 6 days after ingesting the bacteria.

 

 

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