Monday in Indianapolis, Bill 1343 passed by an Indiana House committee requiring Motorized scooters to have license plates. Operators of motorized scooters would be required to register their vehicle with the Bureau of Motor Vehicles and pass a special examination testing their knowledge of traffic signs. The law would also prohibit these drivers from carrying passengers.

The committee voted unanimously Tuesday to forward the proposal to the full House for consideration. The bill sets a $17.30 charge for registering the scooters with the Bureau of Motor Vehicles and a $10 annual excise tax charge. The bill is now moving to the Indiana Senate for further action.

https://www.facebook.com/ScooterPeopleOfEvansville

To me, several things are accomplished here.  By registering their scooter, the owner will have a better chance of police locating their property should it ever be stolen.  Also, it helps step up the responsibility factor for scooter riders.  Those who have a valid automobile driver's license and carry insurance on their vehicle most likely ride a scooter to save money on gas or wear and tear on the car/truck, etc.  This group of people are used to going through the responsible process of being licensed and registered anyway.  However, It's likely to be a bit harder for the, what is probably, the majority of local scooter riders locally who use that mode of transportation because they have lost their license due to multiple DUI's or other traffic infractions.  If I were to play off of the stereotype, many in this group weren't responsible enough to keep the privilege of possessing a vehicle operator's license in the first place.  I have question as to whether they will now take hold of this new responsibility of not only registering their vehicles plus taking a written exam.

Lastly, I am not anti-scooter...I am against those who don't adhere to traffic laws and respect other drivers.  I would say the same thing about many of the operators of any vehicle on the roadways.  Remember, having that driver's license is a privilege, not a right.